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Academic Disciplines Biological and Environmental Sciences
Education
Marine Biology

Seychelles Marine Conservation Service Learning Program

Participate in marine species research contributing towards data collection for the local government on various conservation initiatives.


Program Information

Join an expedition team working on critical marine conservation projects alongside local partners in the pristine islands of the Seychelles.

United Nations
Sustainable Development Goals

Overview

GVI operates two bases located in the crystal clear waters of the Indian Ocean among the beautiful islands of the Seychelles: Curieuse Island and the island of Mahe, both within National Marine Parks next to stunning palm-fringed beaches and forested areas. This program will focus on preserving marine species, gaining a better understanding of the local ecosystem and preserving its biodiversity, on Curieuse Island.



These projects range in content suitable for students studying academic disciplines such as:

- Education
- Biological & Environmental Sciences
- Marine Biology

Example project activities include:

- Hawksbill turtle nesting surveys
- Mangrove monitoring
- Lemon shark tagging
- Workshops on eco-tourism with resort/hotel guests.

Program Details

Location: Africa - Seychelles

Enquiry Form

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Enquiry Details

   

Curriculum

This inter-disciplinary program introduces students to international service-learning and sustainable development in content and practice. Through lectures, discussion, research, service, and reflection (beginning two weeks prior to their departure and continuing two weeks after their return home), students in this course engage in meaningful, context-driven service-learning at home and abroad. Emphasis will be placed on relating long-term project goals with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and engaging in daily reflection surrounding the experience, which will be led by qualified group facilitators who are trained to enhance individual student development. The program  curriculum will be tailored to your students’ academic needs as well as any faculty requirements.

A GVI service-learningprogram  provides students with the opportunity to live and work within the “classroom” of their chosen field of study, and to develop professional capacities associated with intercultural competency, global citizenship, teamwork, problem-solving, and leadership. By participating in this program , students will be prepared to contribute to solutions for critical global issues related to sustainable development within a local community, and alongside an international team.

The Project

The objectives for each GVI project are based on specific United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. In Seychelles, students will largely contribute to pre-established environmental monitoring and research initiatives by collecting and reporting critical data. Emphasis will also be placed on increasing awareness surrounding pertinent conservation issues and knowledge of the local environment.

Mahe's short, mid, and long-term objectives


All of our programs have short, mid and long-term objectives that fit with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. This enables us to report on our collaborative impact across the world in a streamlined manner, measuring which UN SDGs we are making a substantial contribution to. Furthermore, this will help our local partners and communities measure and visualize their contribution to the UN SDGs.Upon arrival to base, you will be educated about the history of the UN SDGs. You will learn about the specific goals of your location, the long-, mid- and short-term objectives, and also clarification of how your personal, shorter-term involvement contributes to these goals on a global level.

Our aim is to educate you on local and global issues, so that you continue to act as active global citizens after your program, helping to fulfil our mission of building a global network of people united by their passion to make a difference.



Learn about the long-term objectives you will be contributing to in Mahe:


1. To provide a long term and consistent collection of data, assessing the overall health and development of the reef system within Northern Mahe, Seychelles, on behalf of the Seychelles National Parks Authority, to be used for regional coastal marine management and international understanding of changing reef systems.


2. Increase the scientific output and awareness of the project through publication of findings


3. Increase awareness of GVI Seychelles projects in-country


4. Continue to support the President's Village Children's Home aim of providing a safe and friendly environment for children under the age of 18


5. Increase in-country capacity by providing training in environmental education and training


6. Continue to minimize our environmental impact at Cap Ternay and raise awareness of environmental issues amongst volunteers and visitors

Itinerary

Example Itinerary:

This program  varies in duration, depending on project requirements as well as environmental expeditions or activities. The below outlines a one week in-country program ; however, your in-country service can run for as many weeks as set by your academic curriculum, objectives, and requirements.

Pre-Departure

Two weeks prior to departure, students will be assigned readings and assignments. These assignments make sure they have a basic understanding of Seychelles and its local marine conservation-based issues; a foundational understanding of international service learning and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals; and begin a dialogue surrounding global engagement. Materials will be chosen based on collaboration with the group’s educational leader to ensure the work fits within the group’s in-class curriculum.

In-Country:

Day 1- Arrival at Airport and Transfer to Base

Your team will be met at the airport by a GVI staff member or appointed representative. The group will travel immediately to the project location.

Students will be accommodated in dorm-style rooms, and will have a chance in the afternoon to relax and settle in. In the afternoon, there will be an initial welcome presentation and introduction to the GVI staff, history and background of the projects, as well as a health and safety breakdown.

Day 2- Welcome and Orientation

The next day will include a welcome presentation and introduction to the history and background of the marine conservation efforts GVI is involved in, both in Seychelles and worldwide. There will also be a guided introduction to the local area. In the evening, a reflection period will take place in which participants will debrief and review their initial reactions and observations on the experience and location.

Day 3-6- Daily Structure: Service, Education, and Reflection

During the week the group will get involved in activities such as beach profiling, Coco de Mer monitoring, invasive specific removal, techniques used in marine research and monitoring, beach cleans, environmental outreach activities, or native vegetation restoration. The group will also listen to lectures and workshops by GVI field staff and local partners on the effects of tourism and development on marine ecosystems.

All service elements will be connected to a greater understanding of the cultural context in which the students are working. Assignments, in the form of lectures, readings, written response papers, journal entries, group presentations, and miscellaneous creative projects will be conducted daily to enhance student learning from their service involvement. Daily reflection sessions will act as the bridge that connects and helps to synthesize the many aspects of the experience.

Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which participants are working towards achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Students will critically examine their part in this process, by analyzing their contributions, challenges, and observations.

Day 7- A Fond Farewell

GVI field staff transfer the team back to the airport and bid them a fond farewell! GVI will endeavor to keep the group informed of any updates there might be in the field and with particular reference to the projects participants contributed to during their time in Seychelles

Post-Return

Students will continue to engage with active reflection and educational expansion two weeks after leaving Seychelles, with emphasis placed on incorporating the international experience, and insights gained which are then applied to the students’ home context. Assignments will involve generating ideas to continue global engagement, connecting the experience to personal and career goals, and reflecting on the insights gained while in the field.

What's It like?

If you’d like to find out what the experience of joining a GVI project is really like, simply contact us and we’ll put you in touch with one of our many Alumni.

We’ll try to match you to an Alum based on your location, nationality, age, stage of academic career, gender, and program interests. This allows you to gain insights into the experience that is most relevant to you.

Depending on your location you might be able to speak to an Alum over the phone or online, or meet up with them face-to-face at a coffee shop nearby. We also run a series of small events around the world where you can speak to GVI Alumni, Ambassadors and staff members.

Live Updates

Follow GVI Volunteer-In-Mahe's Facebook page for live updates straight from the field. Get an idea of the types of projects you might be involved in, meet our staff and participants, experience life on this GVI base, hear about free time activities, and learn about the local culture and environment.
 
GVISeychellesMahe

Meet the team - Senior Field Management

Alan Grant

Program Manager

This is Alan, the Program Manager at GVI’s base in Curieuse, Seychelles. He joined GVI as a Science Officer back in 2014 and became the Program Manager a year later! Alan is originally from Scotland and studied Marine and Freshwater Biology at the University of Glasgow. Alan has had a lot of experience in his field, working at an array of different field stations around the world. This includes completing shark research in the Bahamas. All-in-all Alan would sum himself up using the terms: island, tropics, and sharks - an interesting mix to say the least!

Chris Mason-Parker

Regional Director for the Seychelles and Greece

This is Chris. He is GVI’s Regional Director for both the Seychelles and Greece. He joined GVI over ten years ago, starting our as a Science Officer based in Mexico. After this he transferred to the Seychelles.


Chris has had an interesting and varied upbring. He is from the UK, heis half French, but grew up in Hong Kong. These early years of Chris’s life is what fueled his passion for travel.

Jim

Program Manager

Introducing you to Jim, the Program Manager at GVI’s base in Mahe, Seychelles. He has been in the Seychelles with GVI for two years now. Before this, Jim was the Base Manager at GVI’s Mexico base for three epic years.


Jim is originally from the UK, where he studied Environmental Science at the University of Leeds. Jim enjoys his life, which involves working around the world in locations he describes as “paradise”.

An awesome fact about Jim is that prior to joining GVI, he was very into his athletics. He could run the 100 meters in less than 11 seconds. Pretty impressive stuff.

Meet the team - In-Country Staff

Andy

Science Coordinator

This is Andy. She is originally from Mexico, where she studied a degree in Biology. She is the Science Coordinator at GVI base in Mahe, Seychelles and has worked in other places around the world with GVI before this.


Interestingly enough, Andy used to be a fencer before her journey with GVI began. This allowed her to travel around the world with her sword!

Katie

Science Officer

Say hey to Katie. Katie is one of GVI’s Science Officers at the base in Mahe, Seychelles. Katie began her journey with GVI as a volunteer. She then became a Scholar and is now part of the full time staffing team.


Katies has a degree in Animal Welfare and completed a Masters in Ecology. After doing this she spent time working as an Ecological Consultant, until she found GVI.

A fun fact about Katie is she is a keen mountaineer and has climbed over 6000 meter high on a trek!

Nico

Science Officer

Meet Nico, who is from Germany. He is based at our Mahe base in the Seychelles, and is a Science Officer. He previously studied at Bangor University in North Wales. Here he undertook a degree in biology and zoology. While at university, Nico used to play American football.

Victoria Beasley

Science Coordinator

Meet Victoria, the Science Coordinator at GVI’s Curieuse base in Seychelles. Both Victoria's parents were veterinarians so she has a lot of experience with animals, spending her life surrounded by them. She also comes from a family of keen divers and completed her dive certificate at the tender age of 13, fair play! This diving is what sparked her interest in conservation and inspired her to pursue a career in it.

Your Impact

All of our programs have short, mid and long-term objectives that fit with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals or UN SDGs. This enables us to report on our collaborative impact across the world in a streamlined manner, measuring which UN SDGs we are making a substantial contribution to. Furthermore, this will help our local partners and communities measure and visualise their contribution to the UN SDGs.


Upon arrival to base, you will be educated about the history of the UN SDGs. You will learn about the specific goals of your location, the long-, mid- and short-term objectives, and also clarification of how your personal, shorter-term involvement contributes to these goals on a global level.


Our aim is to educate you on local and global issues, so that you continue to act as active global citizens after your program, helping to fulfil our mission of building a global network of people united by their passion to make a difference.


Healthy corals are key to the health of our planet. They help fish populations regenerate themselves providing shelter for young fish, they assist in removing excess carbon dioxide from our atmosphere, and protect living spaces near the shore from damage by waves and storms.


In 1998 a massive coral bleaching event decimated many coral reefs around the globe, including the reefs surrounding the inner granitic islands of Seychelles. Coral bleaching occurs when rising water temperatures cause the algae that live on corals to detach themselves from their hosts. Algae is the main food source for corals and helps to maintain the structure of the corals. Warm waters are the result of climate change caused by excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.


Efforts to monitor the recovery of reefs in Seychelles were initiated after the 1998 event. This began with a 3 year project, named the Shoals of Capricorn, which extensively monitored the entire inner islands. The Seychelles Centre for Marine Research & Technology, SCMRT, was set up at this time to continue the work, and to aid the Seychelles National Parks Authority, SNPA, with the management of the marine parks. After the Shoals of Capricorn project the monitoring was then taken over by Reef Care International.


In addition to the high seasonal sea temperatures, the coral reefs around Seychelles, face numerous other threats such as population pressure, poaching, and unsustainable tourism, all of which are challenging to quantify without a solid, scientific basis. In order to effectively manage and conserve the reef, a continuous monitoring program is necessary to build up a comprehensive picture of the ecological health of the reef.


Coral and Fish Surveys

We established our project in Seychelles in 2004 with the aim of aiding SNPA. At over 20 sites across the North-West coast of Mahe, GVI staff and participants use the protocols of Reef Care International in order to survey the reefs noting the health of existing coral, evidence of new young coral growing on the reef, as well as fish species present and their numbers. Data on coral recovery, as well as fish abundance and diversity is passed on to the SNPA to assist with their management decisions, which might include updates to policies, expanding currently protected areas, or protecting additional areas. In addition, participants use a different coral monitoring technique, to provide data to CoralWatch, a worldwide coral monitoring methodology, based in Queensland University, Australia, which aims to monitor coral bleaching and recovery events around the globe.


Commercial Marine Species Surveys

Unsustainable fishing is also a threat to the health of the Seychellois marine life. In addition this also affects the wellbeing of the local community, because many rely on fish for daily sustenance, and the growth of the local economy, because seafood from Seychelles is sold to international visitors to the islands and consumers abroad. Its underwater treasures are also the reason why many visit every year, bringing capital into the country. We assist Seychelles Fishing Authority, SFA with monitoring commonly harvested species like octopus, lobster, and sea cucumber populations.


Marine Megafauna Sightings

Incidental sightings of marine megafauna like tiger sharks and manta rays, occur frequently during dives, and this information is noted and passed on to the Ocean Biogeographic Information System or OBIS Seamap, an online database designed to keep track of various larger marine species around the world.  


Marine Plastic Pollution Cleanups

Ocean floor clean up dives are also regularly conducted as part of the Dive Against Debris or DAD initiative. The data about marine plastics collected is sent on to Project AWARE an organisation established to monitor the abundance and diversity of marine debris around the world.


Environmental Education

Environmental education is also an important part of our GVI Mahe program. The main aim of this program is to get locals involved in discussions around issues affecting their marine environment.


The main United Nations Sustainable Development Goal we work on at GVI Mahe is  #14, Life Below Water.


Our Partners In

Project Objectives

 


GVI Mahe, Seychelles Long-term Objectives:


1. Provide a long-term and consistent collection of data, assessing the overall health and development of the reef system in Northern Mahe on behalf of the Seychelles National Parks Authority, SNPA, to be used for regional coastal marine management and international understanding of changing reef systems.


2. Increase the scientific output and awareness of the project through publication of findings.


3. Continue to support the International School of Seychelles by providing their students with environmental education with a strong focus on marine ecosystems and their inhabitants.


4. Increase in-country capacity by providing training in environmental education and training to local communities and by offering placement opportunities for students.


5. Continue to minimise our environmental impact at Cap Ternay and raise awareness of environmental issues amongst participants and visitors.


Cultural Immersion

Engaging intimately with a new context teaches not only global awareness but adaptability and critical thinking, skills highly valued in the modern marketplace. Local and cultural immersion is encouraged on all our programs around the world, and is also one of the most enjoyable aspects of your experience. Luckily, there are many activities you can get involved with in your free time, or before and after your program. On our community programs the focus is on cultural topics, while on marine or wildlife programs the emphasis is more on the environmental element. Use your evenings and weekends to explore diverse and eclectic topics like Theravada Buddhism in Laos or how plastic pollution and climate change affects Indian Ocean coral.


Baie Ternay National Marine Park

Our marine research base is located in the secluded Baie Ternay Marine National Park,  a protected coastal reserve, about an hour’s drive from the capital of Victoria and the Seychelles International Airport. The beautiful bay area consists of coastal habitats including mangroves wetlands, seagrass beds, and coral reefs. Among the mangroves you will find species of fish, crab, and birds found exclusively in the Seychelles. Venture further into the water and spy green and hawksbill turtles snacking on seagrass. Deeper in, corals reefs start to span the ocean floor. The dazzling diversity of this underwater garden will surprise you. Here you can also spot emperor angelfish, butterflyfish, octopus, white-tip reef sharks and manta rays. You might even be lucky enough to spot one of the whale sharks who visit the islands for a short time every year.


Mahe

GVI’s marine conservation program in the Seychelles is based on the main island of Mahe, the largest granitic island in the Seychelles, surrounded by coral reef, granite drop offs and white sandy beaches. The island rises up to forest-covered mountainous terrain with steep winding roads throughout the island. Turquoise-blue waters house expansive fringing reefs providing habitats to a staggering variety of fish and marine invertebrates. The steep shelf surrounding the islands mean that along with the high diversity of reef fish, oceanic species such as tuna and sailfish are common just offshore. It is home to the capital of the Seychelles, Victoria. Despite being the most populous island in the Seychelles, it is has very few inhabitants compared to most of the urban areas international visitors are use to, and Mahe’s natural habitat is very well-preserved.


Seychelles

The Seychelles is a tropical archipelago off the East Coast of Africa, consisting of 100 islands. Islands located near the center of the group are made of granite and researchers believe that this means they use to form part of the Indian subcontinent. The granite islands attracted corals to their shallower waters and most of the outer islands of the Seychelles are based on coral or sand. The islands are famous for their biodiversity and are home to literally thousands of land and underwater species. The waters of the Indian Ocean are a haven for coral conservation efforts making the Seychelles a sought-after diving destination.


Curieuse Island

GVI’s island conservation program in the Seychelles is based on the island of Curieuse, which itself and its surrounding waters are a national park, managed by our principal in-country partner, Seychelles National Parks Authority. On Curieuse you can experience true island culture, as Curieuse has very few inhabitants compared to most of the other larger islands, making its natural habitat very well-preserved. This beautiful coastal area consists of unique habitats including mangroves wetlands, seagrass beds, and coral reefs. 


Seychelles

The Seychelles is a tropical archipelago off the East Coast of Africa, consisting of 100 islands. The main, or so-called inner islands, are made of granite. Researchers believe that they use to form part of the Indian subcontinent. The granite attracted corals and most of the outer islands of the Seychelles are based on coral. The islands are famous for their unique biodiversity and are home to literally thousands of unique land and underwater species. The waters of the Indian Ocean are a haven for coral conservation efforts making the Seychelles a sought-after diving destination.


Festivals

There are festivals throughout the year, the most notable being the Seychelles International Carnival of Victoria in February, which celebrates the cultures that helped shape the Seychelles. There is also the La Digue Festival in mid-August and the Creole Festival in October, and for those interested in the natural world, there is the SUBIOS Underwater Festival on Mahe’s main beach in October, celebrating underwater conservation.


Languages

Seychellois Creole is spoken by the majority of the native Seychellois, roughly 95% of the populations, but as the island country was a British colony, English is the language officially used in government and business dealings. French is also spoken on the islands, by a minority.


Our Ethics

Below is a list of core ethics and best practices we believe are essential to the operation of high quality, ethical volunteer and sustainable development programs. We believe that all responsible volunteer and sustainable development operations should focus upon these principles. If you are considering volunteering, these are some of the key considerations you should question, to ensure that your time and money contributes towards positive change.


 


We want to constantly develop our own understanding of ethical best practice. In so doing, we aim to provide an exemplary industry standard for other education institutions, international development organisations, and social enterprises. Our Badge of Ethics stands for the drive to always do good, better. Find out more, click on the Badge below.


 

Our 10 Ethical Commitments

 

Locally Driven, Collaborative Projects

We aim to design all our projects in collaboration with local organizations and communities and ensure that they are locally driven.


 

Clear Objectives & Sustainable Outcomes

We aim to clearly define short-, mid-, and long-term objectives with sustainable outcomes for all our projects.


 

Impact Reporting

We aim to track, record, and publish the impact of each of our projects.


 

Working Against Dependency

We aim to build in-country capacity by assisting local organizations in becoming self-sustaining.


 

Responsible Exit Strategies

For each local organization we work with, we aim to have a plan in place for withdrawing support responsibly.


 

Clear Roles & Specialized Training

We aim to ensure that ever participant is assigned a clear role and that they are fully trained and supported to carry out their work by specialized staff.


 

Respect for all

In all our actions we aim to respect the skills and efforts of all and seek to protect the rights, culture and dignity of everyone who engages with GVI.


 

Local Ownership

We work to ensure that credit for the results of any project, along with any data collected, research conducted, or Intellectual Property developed, remains the property of local organizations.


 

Transitioning from the Orphanage Model

We do not condone and aim to withdraw support of orphanages and residential care centers.


 

Child and Vulnerable adult policies

We will live by our Child Protection and Vulnerable Adult policies.


Continual Development

As an organization, GVI is committed to striving toward best practice, and to educating both our potential participants, our partners, and the world at large about them. Both the volunteering and sustainable development sectors are increasingly, and rightly, under scrutiny. Many recent local and global articles highlight poor practices and questionable ethics. GVI is widely recognized for striving to apply global best practice in the volunteering, education and sustainable development sectors throughout our operations by reputable organizations such as ChildSafe.


However, global best practice is always evolving and we dedicate both time and resources to engage with internationally respected experts and learn from the latest research to ensure our programs both fulfil their potential to create maximum positive impact, and minimise their potential to create unintentional negative impact. Along with and as part of the sustainable development and volunteering community, we are constantly learning and applying this learning to practice. We do not always get everything right, but we seek feedback from our community members, partners, participants and our staff, and react accordingly. We know are already doing a great job, and feedback we have received confirms this, but we aim to do even better and are continuously refining our operations to improve upon our already excellent reputation.


Parent Info

‘If only every student could do this. It changes your life in all the right ways,’ says Chris Heritage, parent of Luke Heritage, one of our teen volunteers who has participated on two GVI programs, one in Costa Rica and another in South Africa.

We are a parent-run organisation that is incredibly serious about health and safety, and increasing the impact, as well as the long-term career benefits of our programs. Our programs help young people develop the skills to select a career path that is personally fulfilling, and live a life aligned to the well-being of our planet and the global community.

Ken and Linda Jeffrey, whose son Sam volunteered with GVI in Thailand, talk about how the experience affected Sam. He also went on to volunteer with GVI again in South Africa. ‘I know it sounds like a cliche but in a sense, he did go away as a boy and he came back as a young man. Both of us could recommend GVI without any hesitation to any other parent thinking about exploring an opportunity for their children to explore the world and to see different parts of it.’

Parent Info Pack

Download the Parent Pack and learn more about:

Our staff: All our projects are run by staff, selected, vetted, trained, and managed by our central office.
Health and safety: Our safety practices include a child and vulnerable adult protection policy and high participant ratios.
Staying in touch: See what’s happening on base, by following a hub’s dedicated Facebook page.
Free parent consultations: We would love to talk to you about exciting opportunities available for your child.

Support & Safety

We won’t sugarcoat it — traveling abroad is usually a complex process that carries an element of risk. But this is exactly why we’re passionate about providing extensive support throughout the process as well as the highest safety standards during the in-country phase. We believe that volunteering abroad should not only be impactful, but an enjoyable experience that carries as little risk as possible. This is exactly how we’ve been able to maintain our reputation as the most highly respected volunteering organisations in the sector over the past two decades.


Support

Once a participant books, our support team will oversee their pre-departure journey. This helps to bridge the gap between program enrolment and arrival at one of our field bases. We will ensure that you are provided with all the necessary information required to apply for visas, background checks, and any other documentation.


Safety

Once a participant books, our support team will oversee their pre-departure journey. This helps to bridge the gap between program enrolment and arrival at one of our field bases. We will ensure that you are provided with all the necessary information required to apply for visas, background checks, and any other documentation.


Health & Safety Case Studies

19 Nov

HOW GVI UPHOLDS HEALTH AND SAFETY

It takes courage to book a GVI program, get on a flight, and head off to somewhere new. Volunteering offers a level of cultural immersion that typical backpacking or holidays just can’t achieve. This is why thousands of people around the world participate in paid GVI programs.


1 Nov

GVI’S COMMITMENT TO SAFETY AND SECURITY

As the saying goes: ‘Expect the best, plan for the worst’. Cliched or not, we take it to heart. This tenet is at the core of how GVI operates when it comes to promoting the health and safety of our participants, staff, and local community members at all of our 20+ bases around the world.


6 Nov

HOW GVI REMAINS PREPARED FOR NATURAL DISASTERS

The weather isn’t just a topic for polite small-talk here at GVI. We have emergency action plans in place for all scenarios. So when the weather, or other natural forces, takes a nasty turn, we are prepared to respond to stormy situations.


5 Nov

HOW GVI MANAGES PARTICIPANTS EXPECTATIONS

Once GVI has matched a participant to a program that suits their passions and goals, our team aims to set the right expectations for them. In the event that false expectations around a program are created, the GVI team takes immediate action to ensure that the situation rectified.


What's Included

  • 24-hour emergency phone
  • 24-hour in-country support
  • A dedicated course co-ordinator
  • Access to Alumni Services and Discounts
  • Airport pick-up (unless otherwise stated)
  • All necessary project equipment and materials
  • All necessary project training by experienced staff
  • Flight bookings service on request
  • In-country transport costs
  • Insurance on request
  • Location orientation
  • Long term experienced staff
  • Meals while on project (except on work placements for long term internships)
  • Safe and basic accommodations (usually shared)
  • Welcome meeting

What's Not Included

  • Additional drinks and gratuities
  • Extra local excursions
  • Flights
  • International and domestic airport taxes
  • Medical and travel insurance
  • Personal items and toiletries
  • Police or background check
  • Visa costs (where necessary)